Tag Archives: updates

#431827 How Technology Disrupts and Drives The ...

Photo credit Technology sets us apart and puts us at the forefront, and one industry that is definitely embracing automation and robotics readily is the motor industry. Technology has touched every aspect of motoring – from updates to the manufacturing process that produce much safer and more reliable vehicles to black box diagnostics being used …
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#431790 FT 300 force torque sensor

Robotiq Updates FT 300 Sensitivity For High Precision Tasks With Universal RobotsForce Torque Sensor feeds data to Universal Robots force mode
Quebec City, Canada, November 13, 2017 – Robotiq launches a 10 times more sensitive version of its FT 300 Force Torque Sensor. With Plug + Play integration on all Universal Robots, the FT 300 performs highly repeatable precision force control tasks such as finishing, product testing, assembly and precise part insertion.
This force torque sensor comes with an updated free URCap software able to feed data to the Universal Robots Force Mode. “This new feature allows the user to perform precise force insertion assembly and many finishing applications where force control with high sensitivity is required” explains Robotiq CTO Jean-Philippe Jobin*.
The URCap also includes a new calibration routine. “We’ve integrated a step-by-step procedure that guides the user through the process, which takes less than 2 minutes” adds Jobin. “A new dashboard also provides real-time force and moment readings on all 6 axes. Moreover, pre-built programming functions are now embedded in the URCap for intuitive programming.”
See some of the FT 300’s new capabilities in the following demo videos:
#1 How to calibrate with the FT 300 URCap Dashboard
#2 Linear search demo
#3 Path recording demo
Visit the FT 300 webpage or get a quote here
Get the FT 300 specs here
Get more info in the FAQ
Get free Skills to accelerate robot programming of force control tasks.
Get free robot cell deployment resources on leanrobotics.org
* Available with Universal Robots CB3.1 controller only
About Robotiq
Robotiq’s Lean Robotics methodology and products enable manufacturers to deploy productive robot cells across their factory. They leverage the Lean Robotics methodology for faster time to production and increased productivity from their robots. Production engineers standardize on Robotiq’s Plug + Play components for their ease of programming, built-in integration, and adaptability to many processes. They rely on the Flow software suite to accelerate robot projects and optimize robot performance once in production.
Robotiq is the humans behind the robots: an employee-owned business with a passionate team and an international partner network.
Media contact
David Maltais, Communications and Public Relations Coordinator
d.maltais@robotiq.com
1-418-929-2513
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Press Release Provided by: Robotiq.Com
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#430796 Kuri Robot Brings Autonomous Video to a ...

Mayfield Robotics improves their home robot Kuri, adding track wheels, structural updates and “Kuri Vision,” an autonomous home video program Continue reading

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#429777 This Week’s Awesome Stories From ...

TRANSPORTATION
Have Scientists Discovered the Cure for Potholes?Angela Chen | The Verge"Self-healing asphalt has been tested on 12 different roads in the Netherlands, and one of these has been functioning and open to the public since 2010. All are still in perfect condition, but Schlangen notes that even normal asphalt roads are fine for about seven to 10 years and that it’s in upcoming years that we’ll really start to see the difference. He estimates that the overall cost of the material would be 25 percent more expensive than normal asphalt, but it could double the life of the road."
ROBOTICS
The Little Robot That Taught the Big Robot a Thing or TwoMatt Simon | WIRED"New research out today from the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory takes a big step toward making such seamless transfers of knowledge a reality. It all begins with a little robot named Optimus and its friend, the famous 6-foot-tall humanoid Atlas."

CONNECTIVITY
A Cheap, Simple Way to Make Anything a Touch PadRachel Metz | MIT Technology Review"Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University say they’ve come up with a way to make many kinds of devices responsive to touch just by spraying them with conductive paint, adding electrodes, and computing where you press on them…Called Electrick, it can be used with materials like plastic, Jell-O, and silicone, and it could make touch tracking a lot cheaper, too, since it relies on already available paint and parts, Zhang says."
3D PRINTING
A New 3D Printing Technology Uses Electricity to Create Stronger Objects for ManufacturingBrian Heater | TechCrunch"FuseBox’s thrust is simultaneously dead simple and entirely complex, but at the most elementary level, it utilizes heat and electricity to increase the temperature of the material before and after each level is deposited. This serves to strengthen the body of the printed product where it’s traditionally weakest during the FDM (fused deposition modeling) print – the same layer-by-layer technology employed by MakerBot and the majority of desktop 3D printers."
SPACE
What Is America's Secret Space Shuttle For?Marina Koren | The Atlantic"The news that the military had a space shuttle quietly orbiting Earth for more than 700 days came as a surprise to some. Why didn’t we know about this thing, the reaction seemed to go. The reaction illustrated the distinct line between the country’s civilian and military activities in space, and how much the general public knows about each."
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#429771 Second Year of Robotic Art Contest

Press Release by: Robotart.org
Robots Have Learned to Paint in Second Year of Robotic Art Contest
Seattle, Wash – April 19, 2017 – It was just announced that Google has developed AI that can sketch images. It should therefore come as no surprise that dozens of robots from around the world are now also painting with a brush, and many of them are quite skilled.
The Robot Art 2017 competition (http://robotart.org) returns for a second year with over 39 painting robots, more than twice the amount participants it had in its inaugural year. In addition to more robots, there is more artwork. More than 200 paintings have been submitted. With regards to the quality of the artwork, the event’s sponsor and organizer, Andrew Conru, sums it up best,
“The quality of the paintings for many of the teams have reached levels that are comparable with human artists. Many of this year’s entries are expressive, layered, and complex.”
The creativity of the teams and robots was evident not only in the artwork they produced, but also in how they went about making the art. Of the 39 painting robots, no two teams took the exact same approach. The Manibus Team captured the movements of a ballerina and painted it to canvas. HEARTalion built a robot that paints based on emotional interactions with humans. share your inner unicorn used brainwaves to control a mark making mobile robot. Other teams built custom robots that capitalized on their innate lack of precision to make abstract work such as Anguis, a soft snake robot that slithers around its canvas. Other robots were built to collaborate with their artistic creators such as Sander Idzerda’s and Christian H. Seidler’s entries.
Robot Painter. Photo Credit: Robotart.orgTwo returning entries that were notable for their skilled approach to representational paintings in last year’s contest, have gone abstract. e-David submitted multiple abstract self-portraits, not of a human, but of the robot itself. Each of its works was a collaboration between an artist and the machine where most of the decisions were actually made by e-David as it continually watched and optimized its own progress on the canvas with multiple external cameras. CloudPainter also submitted multiple abstract portraits. It’s subjects were taken from photoshoots performed by the robot itself. For several of CloudPainter’s paintings, the only artistic decision made by an artist was to schedule the photoshoot. The robot then used artificial intelligence and deep learning to make all other “artistic” decisions including taking the photos, making an original abstract composition from its favorite, and then executing each brushstroke until it had calculated it had done the best it could to render its original abstract composition.
Robot Painter. Photo Credit: Robotart.orgThe Robot Art 2017 competition will be running between now and May 15th when more than $100,000 in awards will be given to the top painting robots. Winners will be determined based on a combination of public voting, professional judges consisting of working artists, critics, and technologists, and by how well the team met the spirit of the competition – that is to create something beautiful using a physical brush and robotics. The public can see the artwork vote on their favorite robotic paintings at https://robotart.org/artworks/.
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