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  • Teaching robots to sort out their issues
    Robots can help do a lot of things—assemble cars, search for explosives, cook a meal or aid in surgery. But one thing they can’t do is tell you how they’re doing—yet.

  • Grown-ups with supportive robots
    Robots will be a necessity with the ageing population needing assistance to improve their mobility. On the long road to help seniors maintain their life quality, EU researchers have developed a unique prototype robot.

  • SmokeBot – a robot serving rescue units
    SmokeBot is a robot developed to assist fire services and rescue units in deployments under critical conditions. It collects data about accident and disasters situations with extremely limited visibility, effectively improving the safety of rescue operations.

  • Robot vision makes solar cell manufacture more efficient
    “The price of solar-generated electricity continues to plummet, and the technology is taking over as the least expensive form of energy in more and more parts of the world,” says solar cell researcher John Atle Bones at SINTEF.

  • 'iPal' robot companion for China's lonely children
    It speaks two languages, gives math lessons, tells jokes and interacts with children through the tablet screen in its chest—China’s latest robot is the babysitter every parent needs.

  • How to build a robot that mimics the moves of animals—and why you'd want to
    From slithering and walking to flying or swimming, animals are able to move and interact with their environment with relative ease. However, building a robot with the same capabilities is much more difficult.

  • Teaching robots how to move objects
    With the push of a button, months of hard work were about to be put to the test. Sixteen teams of engineers convened in a cavernous exhibit hall in Nagoya, Japan, for the 2017 Amazon Robotics Challenge. The robotic systems they built were tasked with removing items from bins and placing them into boxes. For graduate student Maria Bauza, who served as task-planning lead for the MIT-Princeton Team, the moment was particularly nerve-wracking.

  • A new micro-robot delivers drugs in capsules
    An international team of researchers, led by Professor Hongsoo Choi, Director of DGIST-ETH Microrobot Research Center, has developed capsule-type microrobots that can encapsulate cells and drugs and deliver them to targeted parts of the human body. Unlike conventional methods that install cells or drugs outside of micro robots, the lids of these microrobots can be open and closed.

  • Japan 'drone-brella' promises hands-free sun cover
    It’s the hands-free experience you never knew you needed—a Japanese company has developed a drone-powered parasol it says can hover over users, protecting them from the sun.

  • Sex robots are already here, but are they healthy for humans?
    World, meet Harmony. Completely artificial and programmed by computer chips, the somewhat lifelike sex robot is marketed by sex doll maker Realbotix for $15,000. According to The Guardian, she’s equipped for intimate relations but is also “the perfect companion,” Realbotix says—able to quote Shakespeare and remember your birthday.

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