News

  • Five reasons why robots won't take over the world
    Scientists are known for making dramatic predictions about the future – and sinister robots are once again in the spotlight now that artificial intelligence has become a marketing tool for all sorts of different brands.

  • New robot for skull base surgery is very accurate, alleviates surgeon's workload
    Drilling out a hole in the skull base has to be done with great precision and often takes many hours. It is an intervention that requires the maximum from a surgeon. Researchers from TU/e have therefore developed a surgery robot to take over this task. With sub-millimeter precision, the robot can automatically and safely mill a cavity of the desired shape and dimensions. Jordan Bos will receive his Ph.D. on 16 April for the robot he designed and built. The robot is expected to perform its first surgery within five years.

  • Drones will soon decide who to kill
    The US Army recently announced that it is developing the first drones that can spot and target vehicles and people using artificial intelligence (AI). This is a big step forward. Whereas current military drones are still controlled by people, this new technology will decide who to kill with almost no human involvement.

  • UN reopens talks on defining 'killer robots'
    A new round of talks on the use of so-called killer robots reopened at the United Nations on Monday, with a focus on defining the characteristics of autonomous lethal weapons.

  • Robots that can learn like humans
    Researchers say that artificial intelligence (AI) is now superior to human intelligence in supervised learning using vast amounts of labeled data to perform specific tasks. However, it is considered difficult to realize human-like intelligence using only supervised learning because all supervised labels cannot be obtained for all the sensory information required by robots.

  • During bombings, robots played key role for Austin police
    On the morning of March 21, a white Austin police bomb squad truck pulled out of an obscure city facility near Austin-Bergstrom International Airport and rolled north, toward Pflugerville.

  • Samantha's suffering—why sex machines should have rights too
    Late in 2017 at a tech fair in Austria, a sex robot was “molested” repeatedly and left in a “filthy” state. The robot, named Samantha, received a barrage of male attention, which resulted in her sustaining two broken fingers. This incident confirms worries that the possibility of fully functioning sex robots raises both tantalising possibilities for human desire (by mirroring human/sex-worker relationships), as well as serious ethical questions.

  • Automated prep of MS-sensitive fluorescently labeled N-Glycans with a pipetting robot
    A new original research report available ahead-of-print at SLAS Technology demonstrates the semi-automation of a GlycoWorks RapiFluor-MS (RFMS) Kit using a pipetting robot to improve life sciences research productivity. This robotic platform uses standard manual pipettors and an optically guided arm to facilitate the automation of manual procedures, reducing the time researchers spend at the lab bench, and mimicking, as closely as possible, the results obtained when using the manual GlycoWorks RFMS protocol.

  • Robot designed to defend factories against cyberthreats
    It’s small enough to fit inside a shoebox, yet this robot on four wheels has a big mission: keeping factories and other large facilities safe from hackers.

  • Italy's robot concierge a novelty on the way to better AI
    Robby Pepper can answer questions in Italian, English and German. Billed as Italy’s first robot concierge, the humanoid will be deployed all season at a hotel on the popular Lake Garda to help relieve the desk staff of simple, repetitive questions.

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