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  • Robot traps ball without coding
    Dr. Kee-hoon Kim’s team at the Center for Intelligent & Interactive Robotics of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) developed a way of teaching “impedance-controlled robots” through human demonstrations using surface electromyograms (sEMG) of muscles, and succeeded in teaching a robot to trap a dropped ball like a soccer player. A surface electromyogram is an electric signal produced during muscle activation that can be picked up on the surface of the skin.

  • How humans and robots work side-by-side in Amazon fulfillment centers
    Amazon employees start their shifts passing through turnstiles and a sign reminding them what they can’t bring with them as they report for work alongside robots.

  • Machine behavior: A field of study to explore intelligent machines as independent agents
    In 1969, artificial-intelligence pioneer and Nobel laureate Herbert Simon proposed a new science, one that approached the study of artificial objects just as one would study natural objects.

  • Training robots to relieve chronic pain
    Researchers at Swinburne have developed a collaborative robot system to automatically treat back, neck and head pain caused by soft tissue injury.

  • Robot baristas are latest front in S. Korea automation push
    Are robot baristas the future of South Korea’s vibrant coffee culture?

  • British art dealer unveils pioneering robot artist
    Billed as “one of the most exciting artists of our time”, Ai-Da differs from generations of past masters in one inescapable way: she is a robot.

  • Fieldwork Robotics completes initial field trials of raspberry harvesting robot system
    University of Plymouth spinout company Fieldwork Robotics has completed initial field trials of its robot raspberry harvesting system.

  • Army project develops agile scouting robots
    In a research project for the U.S. Army, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley developed an agile robot, called Salto that looks like a Star Wars Imperial walker in miniature and may be able to aid in scouting and search-and-rescue operations.

  • Better together: Human and robot co-workers more efficient, less accident-prone
    More and more processes are being automated and digitized. Self-driving delivery vehicles, such as forklifts, are finding their way into many areas—and companies are reporting potential time and cost savings. However, an interdisciplinary research team from the universities of Göttingen, Duisburg-Essen and Trier has observed that cooperation between humans and machines can work much better than just human or just robot teams alone. The results were published in the International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies.

  • Programming the forces of evolution
    The genius of evolution is rarely seen in action, so the invisible hand guiding the direction of biological systems is often taken for granted. However, by applying the principles of natural selection to research questions and designing robots to carry out these tasks, scientists are creating the world’s first evolutionary machines.

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