Tag Archives: new

#431171 SceneScan: Real-Time 3D Depth Sensing ...

Nerian Introduces a High-Performance Successor for the Proven SP1 System
Stereo vision, which is the three-dimensional perception of our environment with two sensors likeour eyes, is a well-known technology. As a passive method – there is no need to emit light in thevisible or invisible spectral range – this technology can open up new possibilities for three dimensional perception, even under difficult conditions.
But as often, the devil is in the details: for most applications, the software implementation withstandard PCs, but also with graphics processors, is too slow. Another complicating factor is thatthese hardware platforms are expensive and not energy-efficient. The solution is to instead usespecialized hardware for image processing. A programmable logic device – a so-called FPGA – cangreatly accelerate the image processing.
As a technology leader, Nerian Vision Technologies has been following this path successfully forthe past two years with the SP1 stereo vision system, which has enabled completely newapplications in the fields of robotics, automation technology, medical technology, autonomousdriving and other domains. Now the company introduces two successors:
SceneScan and SceneScan Pro. Real eye-catchers in a double sense: stereo vision in an elegant design!But more important is, of course, the significantly improved inner workings of the two new modelsin comparison to their predecessor. The new hardware allows processing rates of up to 100 framesper second at resolutions of up to 3 megapixels, which leaves the SP1 far behind:
Photo Credit: Nerian Vision Technologies – www.nerian.com

The table illustrates the difference: while SceneScan Pro has the highest possible computing powerand is designed for the most demanding applications, SceneScan has been cost-reduced forapplications with lower requirements. The customer can thus optimize his embedded vision solution both in terms of costs and technology.
The new duo is completed by Nerian’s proven Karmin stereo cameras. Of course, industrialUSB3Vision cameras by other manufacturers are also supported.This combination not only supports the above-mentioned applications even better, but alsofacilitates completely new and innovative ones. If required, customer-specific adaptations are alsopossible.
ContactNerian Vision TechnologiesOwner: Dr. Konstantin SchauweckerGotenstr. 970771 Leinfelden-EchterdingenGermanyPhone: +49 711 / 2195 9414Email: service@nerian.comWebsite: http://nerian.com
Press Release Authored By: Nerian Vision Technologies
Photo Credit: Nerian Vision Technologies – www.nerian.com
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#431170 This Week’s Awesome Stories From ...

AUGMENTED REALITY
ZED Mini Turns Rift and Vive Into an AR Headset From the FutureBen Lang | Road to VR“When attached, the camera provides stereo pass-through video and real-time depth and environment mapping, turning the headsets into dev kits emulating the capabilities of high-end AR headsets of the future. The ZED Mini will launch in November.”
ROBOTICS
Life-Size Humanoid Robot Is Designed to Fall Over (and Over and Over)Evan Ackerman | IEEE Spectrum “The researchers came up with a new strategy for not worrying about falls: not worrying about falls. Instead, they’ve built their robot from the ground up with an armored structure that makes it totally okay with falling over and getting right back up again.”
SPACE
Russia Will Team up With NASA to Build a Lunar Space StationAnatoly Zak | Popular Mechanics “NASA and its partner agencies plan to begin the construction of the modular habitat known as the Deep-Space Gateway in orbit around the Moon in the early 2020s. It will become the main destination for astronauts for at least a decade, extending human presence beyond the Earth’s orbit for the first time since the end of the Apollo program in 1972. Launched on NASA’s giant SLS rocket and serviced by the crews of the Orion spacecraft, the outpost would pave the way to a mission to Mars in the 2030s.”
TRANSPORTATION
Dubai Starts Testing Crewless Two-Person ‘Flying Taxis’Thuy Ong | The Verge“The drone was uncrewed and hovered 200 meters high during the test flight, according to Reuters. The AAT, which is about two meters high, was supplied by specialist German manufacturer Volocopter, known for its eponymous helicopter drone hybrid with 18 rotors…Dubai has a target for autonomous transport to account for a quarter of total trips by 2030.”
AUTONOMOUS CARS
Toyota Is Trusting a Startup for a Crucial Part of Its Newest Self-Driving CarsJohana Bhuiyan | Recode “Toyota unveiled the next generation of its self-driving platform today, which features more accurate object detection technology and mapping, among other advancements. These test cars—which Toyota is testing on both a closed driving course and on some public roads—will also be using Luminar’s lidar sensors, or radars that use lasers to detect the distance to an object.”
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#431165 Intel Jumps Into Brain-Like Computing ...

The brain has long inspired the design of computers and their software. Now Intel has become the latest tech company to decide that mimicking the brain’s hardware could be the next stage in the evolution of computing.
On Monday the company unveiled an experimental “neuromorphic” chip called Loihi. Neuromorphic chips are microprocessors whose architecture is configured to mimic the biological brain’s network of neurons and the connections between them called synapses.
While neural networks—the in vogue approach to artificial intelligence and machine learning—are also inspired by the brain and use layers of virtual neurons, they are still implemented on conventional silicon hardware such as CPUs and GPUs.
The main benefit of mimicking the architecture of the brain on a physical chip, say neuromorphic computing’s proponents, is energy efficiency—the human brain runs on roughly 20 watts. The “neurons” in neuromorphic chips carry out the role of both processor and memory which removes the need to shuttle data back and forth between separate units, which is how traditional chips work. Each neuron also only needs to be powered while it’s firing.

At present, most machine learning is done in data centers due to the massive energy and computing requirements. Creating chips that capture some of nature’s efficiency could allow AI to be run directly on devices like smartphones, cars, and robots.
This is exactly the kind of application Michael Mayberry, managing director of Intel’s research arm, touts in a blog post announcing Loihi. He talks about CCTV cameras that can run image recognition to identify missing persons or traffic lights that can track traffic flow to optimize timing and keep vehicles moving.
There’s still a long way to go before that happens though. According to Wired, so far Intel has only been working with prototypes, and the first full-size version of the chip won’t be built until November.
Once complete, it will feature 130,000 neurons and 130 million synaptic connections split between 128 computing cores. The device will be 1,000 times more energy-efficient than standard approaches, according to Mayberry, but more impressive are claims the chip will be capable of continuous learning.
Intel’s newly launched self-learning neuromorphic chip.
Normally deep learning works by training a neural network on giant datasets to create a model that can then be applied to new data. The Loihi chip will combine training and inference on the same chip, which will allow it to learn on the fly, constantly updating its models and adapting to changing circumstances without having to be deliberately re-trained.
A select group of universities and research institutions will be the first to get their hands on the new chip in the first half of 2018, but Mayberry said it could be years before it’s commercially available. Whether commercialization happens at all may largely depend on whether early adopters can get the hardware to solve any practically useful problems.
So far neuromorphic computing has struggled to gain traction outside the research community. IBM released a neuromorphic chip called TrueNorth in 2014, but the device has yet to showcase any commercially useful applications.
Lee Gomes summarizes the hurdles facing neuromorphic computing excellently in IEEE Spectrum. One is that deep learning can run on very simple, low-precision hardware that can be optimized to use very little power, which suggests complicated new architectures may struggle to find purchase.
It’s also not easy to transfer deep learning approaches developed on conventional chips over to neuromorphic hardware, and even Intel Labs chief scientist Narayan Srinivasa admitted to Forbes Loihi wouldn’t work well with some deep learning models.
Finally, there’s considerable competition in the quest to develop new computer architectures specialized for machine learning. GPU vendors Nvidia and AMD have pivoted to take advantage of this newfound market and companies like Google and Microsoft are developing their own in-house solutions.
Intel, for its part, isn’t putting all its eggs in one basket. Last year it bought two companies building chips for specialized machine learning—Movidius and Nervana—and this was followed up with the $15 billion purchase of self-driving car chip- and camera-maker Mobileye.
And while the jury is still out on neuromorphic computing, it makes sense for a company eager to position itself as the AI chipmaker of the future to have its fingers in as many pies as possible. There are a growing number of voices suggesting that despite its undoubted power, deep learning alone will not allow us to imbue machines with the kind of adaptable, general intelligence humans possess.
What new approaches will get us there are hard to predict, but it’s entirely possible they will only work on hardware that closely mimics the one device we already know is capable of supporting this kind of intelligence—the human brain.
Image Credit: Intel Continue reading

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#431156 This AI Helps You Paint Like Van Gogh

A new artificial intelligence system can turn simple sketches into paintings reminiscent of works by great artists of the 19th and 20th centuries, researchers say. Continue reading

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#431143 Review: A New Exhibition Shows That ...

A robot exhibition at Britain’s Science Museum showcases automata from the 1500s to today Continue reading

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